Remember, remember…

Glorious views on the Clyde this morning – all was peace and tranquillity as the skyline glowed into life. Switch on the news, however, and the world feels a lot less peaceful, so a bit of escapist TV is what we hanker for…isn’t it? Full thought below, or you can listen again here at  1:23:09.


Good morning.

In a world of violent news, religious strife and allegations of inappropriate conduct, it’s always a temptation to escape into a world of autumnal cosiness with some catch-up TV. That was the thought in my head last week when I tuned into Gunpowder, a big budget historical dramatisation of the events of 1605 when Guy Fawkes, Robert Catesby and others plotted to blow up the House of Lords. Within the first few minutes, I was drawn into the suspense of a time when religious strife and power struggles led to the brutal persecution of the minority Catholic faith. As events unfolded, the level of brutality shown in the production was both stomach-churning and shocking. So much for escapism.

 

If you’ve been watching this series, you may also have found yourself on the one hand enjoying the intrigue and exploration of a fascinating period of history, and on the other repulsed by the graphic nature of the violence shown. I chose to continue watching, although I thought carefully about it, and the images of torture from the first episode, together with the sounds of the baying crowd, stayed in my mind after the credits rolled.

 

I was still mulling this over the next day when I was reading the account of the crucifixion. The images and sounds of the escapist TV I had watched the night before added a fresh understanding, and I found myself meditating on the violence and the unfairness of the crucifixion. For Christians, the death of Jesus symbolises God’s love, the sacrifice of his son and the atonement for sin. It is pivotal to what I believe, but sometimes I forget what it was really like. It’s easy to turn off the TV when we encounter something unpleasant, but sometimes well-told fiction that makes us uncomfortable helps us make sense of reality.

 

The reality is that pain, violence and strife is something we all experience, either personally or as we engage with difficult news around us. Choosing to live with kindness and compassion, choosing to challenge injustice and champion truth, choosing love over violence is not an escape from brutal reality but rather a response that gives hope a space to flourish.

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