Saints and Sporting Heroes

Happy St Andrew’s Day! This morning’s Thought for the Day was on the topic of looking after those who come after us. Andrew did it, Andy does it, why don’t we all do it? Here’s the full text or,  as usual, you can listen again here at around 7.20am.

Good morning.

St Andrew’s Day offers us the chance to stop and take stock of who we are as a nation. We all know that as Scots we have both good and bad national characteristics. We’re loyal, brave and independently minded, but we can also be thrawn, dour and quick to put down anyone who’s getting too big for their boots. We don’t always cheer each other on, and we’re often surprised when a Scot does well. That’s why it’s great to hear that Sir Andy Murray, whose outwardly dour manner countered by emotional honesty has won over the nation, is investing in the talent of the next generation. Murray, a Grand Slam-winning Olympian, has spoken about how he wants to help younger sportsmen and women negotiate the pressures of the sporting life and achieve their potential. He is personally mentoring younger athletes, and plans to leverage his success to cheer on those who come after him.

Another famous Andrew, our patron saint, was also known for his encouragement of others. We first encounter him going about his business as a fisherman in Galilee. When he saw Jesus, and recognised that he was someone special, he decided to follow him. John’s gospel tells us that] the next thing he did was to go and find his brother, Simon, and tell him that he had found the Messiah, the saviour promised by God. St Andrew was the living embodiment of a man who, having discovered the answer to his spiritual searching, wanted to share what he had found. He didn’t want Simon to miss out on what was on offer.

It’s a selfless act, and leaves me feeling quite challenged about how I pass on what I’ve learned to other people. Too often our increasingly individualistic society encourages us to live for ourselves and forget about helping others. Perhaps our national saint and our national sporting hero have something in common other than a shared name. We all have gifts, talents, wisdom and knowledge that we can pass on. The challenging part is whether we’re prepared to put ourselves out in order to see others succeed, even if it means we get less glory ourselves. Selfless living. Wouldn’t that be a great national characteristic to be known for?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.